Sunday, October 31, 2010

Saint Notburga of Cologne

Saint Notburga of Cologne

Memorial

* 31 October

Profile

Nun at the convent of Saint Mary, Cologne, Germany.

Died

* c.714

Canonized

* Pre-Congregation

Halloween

Hallowe’en

Also known as

* All Hallow’s Eve

Date

* 31 October

Article

Eve of the Feast of All Hallows, that is, All Saints Day. Halloween is a day on which many quaint customs are revived. It is popular in the United States and Scotland, and in the US has become the second largest secular holiday of the year.

Saturday, October 30, 2010

Saint Anne

Memorial

* 26 July

Profile

Mother of Our Lady. Grandmother of Jesus Christ. Wife of Saint Joachim. Probably well off. Tradition says that Anne was quite elderly when Mary was born, and that she was their only child. The belief that Anne remained a virgin in the conception and birth of Mary was condemned by the Vatican in 1677. Believed to have given Mary to the service of the Temple when the girl was three years old. Devotion to her has been popular in the East from the very early days of the Church; widespread devotion in the West began in the 16th century, but many shrines have developed since.

Canonized

* devotion is Pre-Congregation
* cultus extended to the whole Church in 1584

Name Meaning

* gracious one; grace (= Anne)

Patronage

* against poverty
* against sterility
* broommakers
* cabinetmakers
* carpenters
* childless people
* equestrians
* expectant mothers
* grandmothers
* grandparents
* homemakers
* horse men
* horse women
* housewives
* lace makers
* lace workers
* lost articles
* miners
* mothers
* old-clothes dealers
* poor people
* pregnancy
* pregnant women
* riders
* seamstresses
* stablemen
* turners
* women in labour
* —
* Canada
* France
* Micmaqs
* —
* Caxito, Angola, diocese of
* Detroit, Michigan, archdiocese of
* Norwich, Connecticut, diocese of
* Sainte-Anne-de-la-Pocatière, Québec, diocese of
* —
* Adjuntas, Puerto Rico
* Boschi Sant’Anna, Italy
* Brittany, France
* Caserta, Italy
* Castelletto d’Erro, Italy
* Corinaldo, Italy
* Marsaskala, Malta
* Molo, Philippines
* Nueva Valencia, Philippines
* Quebec, Canada
* Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupre, Quebec
* Santa Ana Indian Pueblo
* San Joaquin, Philippines
* Taos, New Mexico


Representation

* door
* holding Mary or Jesus in her arms or lap
* at her betrothal to Joachim
* teaching Mary to read the Bible
* greeting Saint Joachim at Golden Gate
* woman with a book in her hand

Saint Agostina Petrantoni

Also known as
Agostina Pietrantoni
Livia Pietrantoni
Livia Petrantoni
Memorial
13 November
Profile
Nurse at the Holy Spirit Hospital, near the Vatican, in Rome in 1886. Joined the Sisters of Charity, dedicated to service to the sick, in 1887, taking the name Agostina. Worked with the critically ill and contagious, catching typhus and malaria in the process. After she caught tuberculosis, she worked in the TB ward where a patient stabbed her to death during a rape attempt; she died praying that he be forgiven.
Born
27 March 1864 at Pozzaglia Sabina, Rieti, Italy as Livia Petrantoni
Died
murdered 13 November 1913 by Giuseppe Romanelli
Canonized
18 April 1999 by Pope John Paul II
Patronage
abuse victims
against impoverishment
against poverty
martyrs
people ridiculed for their piety

Readings
All is too little for the Lord.

- Saint Agostina We will lie down for such a long time after death that it is worth while to keep standing while we are alive. Let us work now; one day we will rest.

- Saint Agostina Sister Agostina understood that the love of Jesus requires generous service to one's brothers, in whose faces, especially that of the neediest, is reflected the face of Christ. 'God' was the only 'compass' which guided all the decisions of her life. The evangelical ideal of charity to the brethren, specially the smallest, the sick, the abandoned, also led Agostina to the heights of sanctity. Ready to face any sacrifice - an heroic witness of charity - she paid with her blood the price of faithfulness to Love.

Pope John Paul II

Friday, October 29, 2010

Purgatory

Purgatory

Latin: purgare, to cleanse

In ecclesiastical language, the state or the abode of temporary punishment for those souls, who having died in the state of grace, are not entirely free from venial sins or have not yet fully paid the satisfaction due to their transgressions. It is not a state of positive growth in goodness and in merit, but of purification effected by suffering. The Catholic doctrine, defined at the Council of Florence and repeated at the Council of Trent, is

* there is a Purgatory
* the souls suffering there can be helped by the prayers of the faithful, especially by the Sacrifice of the Altar

Although Holy Scripture does not expressly mention Purgatory, it presupposes it, and refers to it clearly enough, e.g., 2 Machabees 12; Matthew 5 and 12; 1 Corinthians 3; Philemon 2; 1 Peter 3. Purgatory is firmly established by tradition and confirmed by the constant belief of the Church in suffrages for the dead. The chief punishment consists in being deprived of the beatific vision (pæna damni). Besides this there is the additional punishment (pæna sensus), which, according to the common belief of the Western Church, consists in real fire. They are certain of their salvation, and are confirmed in good, hence can no longer sin. Since they love God perfectly, they bear their sufferings with resignation. This love of God and resignation to His holy Will, according to many theologians, considerably lessens and mitigates the severest sufferings of Purgatory. In the early Church some heretics denied the existence of Purgatory. In the Middle Ages the Cathari, Waldenses, and Hussites rejected it, and in the 16th century Luther and Calvin and their followers did the same. Protestants, therefore, generally reject it. The Greeks have a vague and indefinite notion of it. Belief in Purgatory fosters piety. It deters man from venial sin, begets a spirit of penance, gives him occasion to practise charity to the dead, and awakens salutary thoughts of the life to come.

Thursday, October 28, 2010

Saint Columba of Iona

Also known as

* Apostle of the Picts
* Coim
* Colmcille
* Colum
* Columbkill
* Columbkille
* Columbus
* Columcille
* Columkill
* Combs

Memorial

* 9 June

Profile

Born to the Irish royalty, the son of Fedhlimidh and Eithne of the Ui Neill clan. Bard. Miracle worker. Monk at Moville. Spiritual student of Saint Finnian. Priest. Itinerant preacher and teacher throughout Ireland and Scotland. Spiritual teacher of Saint Corbmac, Saint Phelim, Saint Drostan, and Saint Fergna the White. Travelled to Scotland in 563. Exiled to Iona on Whitsun Eve, he founded a monastic community there and served as its abbot for twelve years. He and the monks of Iona, including Saint Baithen of Iona and Saint Eochod, then evangelized the Picts, converting many, including King Brude. Attended the Council of Drumceat, 575. Legend says he wrote 300 books.

Born

* 7 December 521 at Garton, County Donegal, Ireland

Died

* 9 June 597 at Iona, Scotland, and buried there
* relics translated to Dunkeld, Scotland in 849

Canonized

* Pre-Congregation

Patronage

* against floods
* bookbinders
* poets
* —
* Ireland
* Scotland
* —
* Derry, Ireland, diocese of
* Dunkeld, Scotland, diocese of
* Pembroke, Ontario, diocese of
* Raphoe, Ireland, diocese of
* —
* Pemboke, Ontario, Canada, city of

Saint Columba of Terryglass

Saint Columba of Terryglass

Also known as

* Colum mac Crimthainn
* Colum moccu Loigse
* Columba of Tirdaglas

Memorial

* 12 December

Profile

Son of Crinthainn. Disciple of Saint Finnian of Clonard; administered Last Rites to Saint Finnian on his death-bed. Spiritual director of Saint Caemban, Saint Fintan, and Saint Mocumin. Founded the monastery of Tirdaglas (Terryglass) in 548, and served as its abbot. Visited Tours, France, and brought back relics of Saint Martin of Tours. One of the Twelve Apostles of Ireland.

Born

* at Leinster, Ireland

Died

* 13 December 552 of plague
* buried in Terryglass monastery

Canonized

* Pre-Congregation

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

Saint Quintian

Saint Quintian

Memorial

* 31 December

Profile

One of a group people martyred in Catania, Sicily, date unknown. No other information has survived.

Canonized

* Pre-Congregation

Tuesday, October 26, 2010

Saint Alexander Briant

Memorial

* 1 December
* 25 October as one of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales

Profile

Born to a yoeman family, described as a handsome young man, and raised Protestant. Studied in Oxford. Convert to Catholicism. Studied at the English College at Rheims, France. Ordained on 29 March 1578.

Returned to Somersetshire, England as a missioner in August 1579. Arrested on 28 April 1581 in London at the home of Father Robert Persons. Tortured in the Tower of London, partially for information on Father Robert’s location. During this misery, he wrote to the Jesuits, asking for admission; they accepted him sometime in his last weeks in prison.

Condemned to death with six other priests on 16 November 1581 at Westminster for the treason of priesthood. Martyred with Saint Ralph Sherwin and Saint Edmund Campion in the persecutions of Queen Elizabeth I. One of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales.

In prison, Alexander made himself a small wooden cross, and gripped it tightly all the times, even during trial. In the courtroom it was wrestled away from him. He told the judge, “You can take it out of my hands, but not out of my heart.” The cross was later bought by Catholics, and is at the English College at Rome.

Born

* 1556 at Somersetshire, England

Died

* hanged, drawn, and quartered on 1 December 1581 at Tyburn, England

Beatified

* 29 December 1886 by Pope Leo XIII (cultus confirmed)

Canonized

* 25 October 1970 by Pope Paul VI

Monday, October 25, 2010

Forty Martyrs of England and Wales

Forty Martyrs of England and Wales

Memorial

* 25 October
* formerly 4 May

Profile

Following the dispute between the Pope and King Henry VIII in the 16th century, faith questions in the British Isles became entangled with political questions, with both often being settled by torture and murder of loyal Catholics. In 1970, the Vatican selected 40 martyrs, men and women, lay and religious, to represent the full group of perhaps 300 known to have died for their faith and allegiance to the Church between 1535 and 1679. They each have their own day of memorial, but are remembered as a group on 25 October. They are

* Carthusians
o Augustine Webster
o John Houghton
o Robert Lawrence
* Brigittine
o Richard Reynolds
* Augustinian
o John Stone
* Jesuits
o Alexander Briant
o Edmund Arrowsmith
o Edmund Campion
o David Lewis
o Henry Morse
o Henry Walpole
o Nicholas Owen
o Philip Evans
o Robert Southwell
o Thomas Garnet
* Benedictines
o Alban Roe
o Ambrose Edward Barlow
o John Roberts
* Friars Observant
o John Jones
* Franciscans
o John Wall
* Secular Clergy
o Cuthbert Mayne
o Edmund Gennings
o Eustace White
o John Almond
o John Boste
o John Kemble
o John Lloyd
o John Pain
o John Plesington
o John Southworth
o Luke Kirby
o Polydore Plasden
o Ralph Sherwin
* Laymen
o John Rigby
o Philip Howard
o Richard Gwyn
o Swithun Wells
* Lay women
o Anne Line
o Margaret Clitherow
o Margaret Ward

Canonized

* 25 October 1970 by Pope Paul VI

Saint Alban Bartholomew Roe

Saint Alban Bartholomew Roe

Memorial

* 21 January
* 25 October as one of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales

Profile

Convert to Catholicism. Studied at the English College at Douai, France, but was dismissed for an infraction of discipline. Benedictine priest in 1612 at Dieulouard, France. Missionary to England. He was arrested and exiled in 1615 for his work. Returning to England in 1618, he was arrested again. He sat in prison until 1623 when the Spanish ambassador obtained his release on condition that Alban leave England. Soon after, Alban returned to his homeland and continued his covert ministry. Arrested again in 1625, he lay in prison for 17 years before being tried and condemned to death for the crime of priesthood. One of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales, dying with Blessed Thomas Reynolds.

Born

* 1583 in Bury Saint Edmunds, Suffolk, England

Died

hanged, drawn, and quartered on 21 January 1642 at Tyburn, London, England

Venerated

* 8 December 1929 by Pope Pius XI (decree of martyrdom)

Beatified

* 15 December 1929 by Pope Pius XI

Canonized

* 25 October 1970 by Pope Paul VI

Today's Saints

Alban Bartholomew Roe
Alexander Briant
Ambrose Edward Barlow
Anne Line
Augustine Webster
Chrysanthus
Crispian
Crispin
Cuthbert Mayne
Cyrinus
Daria
David Lewis
Dulcardus
Edmund Arrowsmith
Edmund Campion
Edmund Daniel
Edmund Gennings
Engratia
Eustace White
Forty Martyrs of England and Wales
Fronto
Fructus
Gaudentius of Brescia
George
Goeznoveus
Guesnoveus
Henry Morse
Henry Walpole
Hilary of Mende
Hildemarca
John Almond
John Boste

John Houghton
John Jones
John Kemble
John Lloyd
John Pain
John Plesington
John Roberts
John Southworth
John Rigby
John Stone
John Wall
Luke Kirby
Lupus of Bayeux
Margaret Clitherow
Margaret Ward
Minias
Miniato
Nicholas Owen
Peter de Geremia
Philip Howard
Philip Evans
Polydore Plasden
Ralph Sherwin
Richard Gwyn
Richard Reynolds
Robert Lawrence
Robert Southwell
Swithun Wells
Tabitha
Thaddeus MacCarthy
Thomas Garnet
Valentine

Monday, October 18, 2010

Saint Castorus

Saint Castorus

Memorial

* 8 November

Profile

One of the Four Crowned Martyrs.

Canonized

* Pre-Congregation

Patronage

* against fever
* cattle
* masons
* sculptors
* stone masons
* stonecutters

Saint Benedict of Nursia

Saint Benedict of Nursia

[Saint Benedict of Nursia]
Also known as

* Benedict of Narsia
* Benedict of Norsia
* Benedetto da Norcia
* Founder of Western Monasticism

Memorial

* 11 July (Latin Rite)
* 21 March (Benedictine monks and nuns)
* 14 March (Byzantine Rite)

Profile

Born to the Roman nobility. Twin brother of Saint Scholastica. Studied in Rome, Italy, but was dismayed by the lack of discipline and the lackadasical attitude of his fellow students. Fled to the mountains near Subiaco, living as a hermit in a cave for three years; reported to have been fed by a raven. His virtues caused an abbey to request him to lead them. Founded the monastery at Monte Cassino, where he wrote the Rule of his order. His discipline was such that an attempt was made on his life; some monks tried by poison him, but he blessed the cup and rendered it harmless. He returned to his cave, but continued to attract followers, and eventually established twelve monasteries. Had the ability to read consciences, the gift of prophesy, and could forestall attacks of the devil. Destroyed pagan statues and altars, drove demons from groves sacred to pagans. At one point there were over 40,000 monasteries guided by the Benedictine Rule. A summation of the Rule: “Pray and work.”

Born

* c.480, Narsia, Umbria, Italy

Died

* 21 March 547 of a fever while in prayer at Monte Cassino, Italy
* buried beneath the high altar there in the same tomb as Saint Scholastica

Canonized

* 1220 by Pope Honorius III

Patronage

* against erysipelas
* against fever
* against gall stones
* against inflammatory diseases
* against kidney disease
* against nettle rash
* against poison
* against temptations
* against witchcraft
* agricultural workers
* cavers
* civil engineers
* coppersmiths
* dying people
* Europe
* farm workers
* farmers
* Heerdt, Germany
* Italian architects
* monks
* Norcia, Italy
* people in religious orders
* school children
* servants who have broken their master’s belongings
* speliologists
* spelunkers
* students
* Subiaco, Italy

Sunday, October 17, 2010

Saint Antonius of Florence

Saint Antonius of Florence

[Saint Antonius of Florence]
Also known as

* People’s Prelate
* Protector of the Poor

Memorial

* 10 May

Profile

When he first tried to join the Dominicans he was refused due to his poor health. When he persisted, the prior told him he could only enter if he could recite the whole of canon law from memory; a year later, in 1405, after spending his time in study, he recited it and was admitted. Priest. Worked for the reforms of Blessed John Dominic. Vicar of the convent of Foligno, Italy in 1414. Prior. Member of the Council of Florence which sought to end the schism between the churches of the east and west. Vicar-General of the Dominicans. Archbishop of Florence, Italy in 1446. Diplomat. Theologian. Healer. Wrote a biography of Blessed John Dominic, a history of the world, and a reference work on moral theology.

Born

* 1 March 1389 at Florence, Italy

Died

* 2 May 1459 at Florence, Italy

Canonized

* 31 May 1523 by Pope Adrian VI

Patronage

* against fever

Representation

* lily
* pair of scales in which he weighs false merchandise against God’s word
* scales
* wearing bishop’s mitre, holding the cross, and giving the sign of blessing in absolution

Saint Amalburga

Saint Amalburga

Also known as

* Amalberga
* Amalia
* Amelberg
* Amelia

Memorial

* 10 July

Profile

Seventh century relative of Saint Pepin of Landen. Married young to Count Witger. Mother of Saint Gudula of Brussels, Saint Emebert, and Saint Reineldis, all of whom she taught herself, including religion. When the youngest was grown, both Amalburga and her husband retired to Benedictine houses, the Count to Lobbes, Belgium, Amalburga to Maubeuge Abbey where she embraced a life of asceticism and prayer. Received the veil from Saint Willibrord of Echternach. She once crossed a lake by riding on the back of a giant sturgeon, which led to her representation on or with a fish.

Born

* in Brabant, Belgium

Died

* 690
* buried beside her husband at the monastery at Lobbes, Belgium
* relics have been in Saint Peter’s abbey church in Ghent, Belgium since 1073

Canonized

* Pre-Congregation

Patronage

* against arm pain
* against bruises
* against fever
* fever victims
* Ghent, Belgium

Representation

* crown
* fish
* geese
* sieve
* woman holding a palm and open book
* woman standing on a giant sturgeon or other fish
* woman with a crown at her feet

Saturday, October 16, 2010

Blessed Andrew Abellon

Blessed Andrew Abellon

Memorial
15 May
Profile
In his youth he got to listen to the preaching of Saint Vincent Ferrer. Dominican at Saint Maximin monastery. Priest. Prior of Saint Mary Magdalen monastery, Provence, France, a noted pilgrimage site; tradition says it is one of the places where Saint Mary Magdalen went after the Crucifixion, and the monastery laid claim to her relics. Supported missionaries and preached home missions. Noted artist in his day, especially known for his manuscript illuminations.
Born
1375 at Saint Maximin, Provence, France
Died
15 May 1450 at Aix-en-Provence, France of natural causes; buried in the Church of the Magdalen; his tomb became known as a site of miraculous cures
Name Meaning
strong, manly (Andrew)
Beatified
1902 (cultus confirmed)
Patronage
against fever
Prayers
God of all truth, you chose Blessed Andrew to preach the gospel of peace and to promote the regular life. By the help of his prayers may we devote ourselves to proclaiming the faith and bearing the yoke of Christ with fidelity. We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. - General Calendar of the Order of Preachers

Saint Adelard of Corbie

Saint Adelard of Corbie

Also known as

* Adalard of Corbie
* Adalhard of Corbie
* Adelhard of Corbie
* Adalardus of Corbie
* Adelardus of Corbie
* Alard of Corbie

Memorial

* 2 January

Profile

Grandson of Charles Martel; nephew of King Pepin the Short; first cousin of Charlemagne. Grew up in the royal court, and was an advisor to Louis le Debonnaire. Adalard gave up the court life in 773 to become a Benedictine monk at Corbie Abbey. Gardener in the monastery. Studied under Blessed Alcuin. Abbot. Advisor to Charlemagne, chaplain, and tutor to prince Bernard who later became king of Naples, Italy. Adelard was exiled to the island of Héri (modern Noirmoutier-en-l’Île, France) in 817 after being accused of supporting Bernard’s revolt against Emperor Louis the Debonair, Charlemagne’s successor. He actually enjoyed the peace that came with the isolation, but was later recalled. With Abbot Wala of Corbie, he founded Corvey Abbey in Saxony. Relics reported to have healed the deaf, the mute, and the paralyzed.

Born

* c.752

Died

* 2 January 827 at Corbie Abbey, Picardy, France following a brief illness
* relics translated in 1026

Canonized

* 1026 by Pope John XIX

Patronage

* against fever
* against typhoid
* gardeners

Representation

* abbot digging a garden with his crown lying nearby
* being crowned with thorns by an angel
* giving alms or food to the poor
* kneeling before a crucifix
* overcoming a dragon by displaying IHS

Friday, October 15, 2010

Saint Abraham of Cyriacus

Saint Abraham of Cyriacus

Memorial

* 15 June

Profile

Captured by bandits in Egypt, he was imprisoned and enslaved by them for five years before he could escape. Making his way to Europe, he lived as a hermit near Clermont, Gaul (modern France). Priest. Abbot of Saint Cyriacus abbey.

Born

* on the banks of the River Euphrates in Mesopotamia (in modern Iraq)

Died

* c.480 of natural causes

Canonized

* Pre-Congregation

Patronage

* against fever

Saint Liborius

Saint Liborius

Memorial
23 July
confined to local calendars since 1969
Profile
Born to a noble family of Gaul. Priest. Bishop of Le Mans, France from 348. Friend of Saint Martin of Tours. Served his diocese for 45 years, building many churches. The translation of his relics from Le Mans to Paderborn led to a sister-city relation that has lasted for over 1,000 years.
Born
early 4th century Gaul
Died
396
relics at Amelia, Umbria and at Paderborn (translated in 836)
Canonized
Pre-Congregation
Patronage
against calculi
against colic
against fever
against gall stones
against gravel
against kidney stones
Paderborn Cathedral
Paderborn, Germany, archdiocese of
Paderborn, Germany, city of
Representation
bishop carrying small stones on a book
bishop with a peacock
peacock
pebbles

Thursday, October 14, 2010

Saint Erasmus

Saint Erasmus

Also known as

* Elmo
* Eramo
* Erarmo
* Ermo
* Herasmus
* Rasimus
* Rasmus
* Telmo

Memorial

* 2 June

Profile

Bishop of Formiae, Campagna, Italy. He fled to Mount Lebanon in the persecutions of emperor Diocletian where he was fed by a raven so he could stay in hiding. Discovered by the authorities, he was imprisoned, but an angel rescued him. Recaptured, he was martyred. One of the Fourteen Holy Helpers. Namesake for the static electric discharge called Saint Elmo’s Fire.

Died

* disemboweled c.303 at Formiae, Italy

Canonized

* Pre-Congregation

Patronage

* against abdominal pains
* against appendicitis
* against birth pains
* against childhood intestinal disease
* against colic
* against danger at sea
* against intestinal disorders
* against seasickness
* against stomach diseases
* against storms
* ammunition workers
* boatmen
* childbirth
* explosives workers
* Gaeta, Italy
* mariners
* navigators
* ordnance workers
* sailors
* watermen
* women in labour

Prayers

* Novena in honour of Saint Erasmus

Representation

* windlass

Saint Eoghan

Saint Eoghan

Also known as
Eugene
Eugenius
Owen
Tir Eoghain
Tyrone
Memorial
23 August
Profile
As a boy he was captured and enslaved by pirates, first to Britain, then to Brittany. Friend of Saint Tighernach. As an adult he escaped from the pirates, returned to Ireland, and became a monk. Abbot of Kilnamanagh Abbey, County Wicklow for 15 years. Retired as a hermit in the the Mourne valley, County Tyrone c.576; his piety attrached many would-be students. Spiritual teacher of Saint Kevin of Glendalough. First bishop of Ardstraw, c.581. He was considered its patron from the beginning; the see was moved to Derry in 1254, and Eoghan continued as a patron.
Born
6th century in Leinster, Ireland
Died
c.618 of natural causes
Canonized
Pre-Congregation
Patronage
diocese of Derry, Ireland

Wednesday, October 13, 2010

Patron Saints Against Fever

* Abraham of Cyriacus
* Adalard
* Amalberga
* Andrew Abellon
* Antoninus of Florence
* Benedict
* Castorus
* Claudius
* Cornelius
* Dominic of Sora
* Domitian of Huy
* Four Crowned Martyrs
* Genevieve
* Gerebernus
* Gertrude of Nivelles
* Hugh of Cluny
* Jodocus
* Liborius
* Mary of Oignies
* Nicostratus
* Peter the Apostle
* Petronilla
* Radegunde
* Raymond Nonnatus
* Remigius of Rheims
* Severus of Avranches
* Sigismund of Burgundy
* Simpronian
* Theobald Roggeri
* Ulric
* Winnoc

Saint Charles Borromeo

Saint Charles Borromeo


Also known as

* Apostle to the Council of Trent
* Carlo Borromeo
* Father of the Clergy

Memorial

* 4 November
* formerly 5 November

Profile

Born to a wealthy, noble family, the third of six children, son of Count Giberto II Borromeo and Margherita de’ Medici. Nephew of Pope Pius IV. Suffered with a speech impediment. Studied in Milan, and at the University of Pavia, studying at one point under the future Pope Gregory XIII. Civil and canon lawyer at age 21. Cleric at Milan, taking the habit on 13 October 1547. Abbot commendatario of San Felino e San Graziano abbey in Arona, Italy, on 20 November 1547. Abbot commendatario of San Silano di Romagnano abbey on 10 May 1558. Prior commendatario of San Maria di Calvenzano abbey on 8 December 1558. Protonotary apostolic participantium and referendary of the papal court to Pope Pius IV on 13 January 1560. Member of the counsulta for the administration of the Papal States on 22 January 1560. Appointed abbot commendatario of Nonatola, San Gallo di Moggio, Serravalle della Follina, San Stefano del Corno, an abbey in Portugal, and an abbey in Flanders, Belgium on 27 January 1560. Created cardinal on 31 January 1560 at age 22.

Apostolic administrator of Milan, Italy on 8 February 1560. Papal legate to Bologna and Romandiola for two years beginning on 26 April 1560. Deacon on 21 December 1560. Vatican Secretary of State. Governor of Civita Castellana,Italy in 1561. Governor of Ancona on 1 June 1561. Made an honorary citizen of Rome, Italy on 1 July 1561. Founded the Accademia Vaticana in 1562. Governor of Spoleto, Italy on 1 December 1562. Ordained on 4 September 1563. Helped re-open the Council of Trent, and participated in its sessions during 1562 and 1563. Named prince of Orta in 1563. Member of the Congregation of the Holy Office. Bishop of Milan on 7 December 1563. President of the commission of theologians charged by the pope to elaborate the Catechismus Romanus. Worked on the revision of the Missal and Breviary. Member of a commission to reform church music. Archbishop of Milan on 12 May 1564. Governor of Terracina, Italy on 3 June 1564. Archpriest of the patriarchal Liberian basilica in Rome in October 1564. Count of the Palatine in 1564. Prefect of the Tridentine Council from 1564 until September 1565. Papal legate in Bologna, Romandiola, legate a latere, and vicar general in spiritualibus of all Italy on 17 August 1565. Grand penitentiary on 7 November 1565. Participated in the conclave of cardinals in 1565 to 1566 that chose Pope Pius V; he asked the new pope to take the name. Protector of the Swiss Catholic cantons; he visited them all several times worked for the spiritual reform of both clergy and laymen. Due to his enforcement of strict ecclesiastical discipline, some disgruntled monks in the Order of the Humiliati hired a lay brother to murder him on the evening of 26 October 1569; he was shot at, but was not hit. Participated in the conclave in 1572 that chose Pope Gregory XIII. Member of the Apostolic Penitentiary in May 1572. Worked with the sick, and helped bury the dead during the plague outbreak in Milan in 1576. Established the Oblates of Saint Ambrose on 26 April 1578. Teacher, confessor and parish priest to Saint Aloysius Gonzaga, giving him his first communion on 22 July 1580. To help the Swiss Catholics he founded the Collegium Helveticum.

Saint Charles spent his life and fortune in the service of the people of his diocese. He directed and fervently enforced the decrees of the Council of Trent, fought tirelessly for peace in the wake of the storm caused by Martin Luther, founded schools for the poor, seminaries for clerics, hospitals for the sick, conducted synods, instituted children’s Sunday school, did great public and private penance, and worked among the sick and dying, leading his people by example.

Born

* morning of Wednesday 2 October 1538 in the castle at Aron, diocese of Novara, Italy

Died

* 8:30pm on 3 November 1584 of a fever at Milan, Italy
* his will named the Hospital Maggiore of Milan as his heir
* buried in the metropolitan cathedral of Milan
* relics transferred to a chapel built by Count Renato Borromeo in piazza San Maria Podone, Milan on 21 September 1751

Beatified

* 1602 by Pope Clement VIII

Canonized

* 1 November 1610 by Pope Paul V

Patronage

* against abdominal pain
* against colic
* against intestinal disorders
* against stomach diseases
* against ulcers
* apple orchards
* bishops
* catechists
* catechumens
* seminarians
* spiritual directors
* spiritual leaders
* starch makers
* —
* Joliette, Québec, diocese of
* Monterey, California, diocese of
* —
* Lombardy, Italy
* Rocca di Papa, Italy

Representation

* cardinal wearing a cord around his neck; it symbolizes the cord or halter worn around his neck during the plague of Milan, Italy in 1575
* bishop wearing a cord around his neck
* cleric curing the sick
* Holy Communion
* coat of arms bearing the word Humilitas

Saint Agapitus

Saint Agapitus

Also known as
Agapito
Memorial
18 April
formerly 18 August
Profile
Young martyr. Because he was a young man, and because the heroic way he met his martyrdom brought about many conversions, his was a favourite story in times past, and often grew in the telling.
Died
thrown to wild animals in the arena
when they would not touch him, he was beheaded c.267 at Palestrina, Italy
relics at Palestrina and Besancon
Canonized
Pre-Congregation
Patronage
against colic