Tuesday, May 10, 2011

Saint Abban of Kill-Abban

Also known as

* Abban of Magheranoidhe
* Abban of Murneave
* Abban of Murnevin

Memorial

* 16 March

Profile

Contemporary of Saint Patrick. Founded Kill-Abban abbey in Leinster, Ireland, and served as its first abbot. Founded the convent for Saint Gobnait of Ballyvourney, Ireland.

Born

* Irish

Died

* 5th century Ireland of natural causes

Canonized

* Pre-Congregation

Monday, May 9, 2011

Saint Abban of New Ross

Also known as
Abhan of New Ross
Evin of New Ross
Ewin of New Ross
Neville of New Ross
Nevin of New Ross
Stephen of New Ross
Memorial
22 December
Profile
Founded Ros-mic-treoin abbey (modern New Ross), and evangelized in the area of Wexford, Ireland.
Born
Irish
Died
at Wexford, Ireland of natural causes
Canonized
Pre-Congregation

Sunday, May 8, 2011

Saint Abban

Memorial
27 October
Profile
Son of Cormac, King of Leinster, Ireland. Nephew and disciple of Saint Ibar. Founded churches in Wexford, and monasteries in Magheranoidhe and Kilabbain.
Born
c.570 in Ireland
Died
620 of natural causes
Canonized
Pre-Congregation

Saturday, May 7, 2011

Saint Abban

Memorial
24 August
Profile
No information has survived.
Born
Irish
Canonized
Pre-Congregation

Friday, May 6, 2011

Saint Abban the Hermit

Also known as
Abben the Hermit
Ewan
Memorial
13 May
Profile
Hermit at Abingdon (formely Abbendun), Berkshire, England, which is named for him. Noted preacher. Founded a monastery in Berkshire. May be the earliest Irish saint.
Born
2nd century Ireland
Canonized
Pre-Congregation

Thursday, May 5, 2011

Saint Cyrus the Physician

Also known as

* Abba Cyrus
* Abbacyrus
* Cher the Physician

Memorial

* 31 January

Profile

Physician in Alexandria, Egypt. His ministry to the sick, and the Christian example he set, brought many others to the faith. He, Saint John, Saint Athanasia, and her three daughters were tortured and martyred for their faith. Their story was told by Saint Sophronius and others.

Died

* beheaded in Canope, Egypt
* buried outside Canope
* relics translated to Manutha, Egypt
* relics translated to Saint Appassara church in Rome, Italy

Canonized

* Pre-Congregation

Patronage

* Portici, Italy

Wednesday, May 4, 2011

Saint Anthony the Abbot

Also known as

* Abba Antonius
* Anthony of Egypt
* Anthony of the Desert
* Anthony the Anchorite
* Anthony the Great
* Antonio Abate
* Father of Cenobites
* Father of All Monks
* Father of Western Monasticism
Memorial

* 17 January (Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox)
* 30 January (Coptic Orthodox, Coptic Catholic)

Profile

Following the death of his parents when he was about 20, Anthony insured that his sister completed her education, then he sold his house, furniture, and the land he owned, gave the proceeds to the poor, joined the anchorites who lived nearby, and moved into an empty sepulchre. At age 35 he moved to the desert to live alone; he lived 20 years in an abandoned fort.

Anthony barricaded the place for solitude, but admirers and would-be students broke in. He miraculously healed people, and agreed to be the spiritual counselor of others. His recommendation was to base life on the Gospel. Word spread, and so many disciples arrived that Anthony founded two monasteries on the Nile, one at Pispir, one at Arsinoe. Many of those who lived near him supported themselves by making baskets and brushes, and from that came his patronage of those trades.

Anthony briefly left his seclusion in 311, going to Alexandria, Egypt to fight Arianism, and to comfort the victims of the persecutions of Maximinus. At some point in his life, he met with his sister again. She, too, had withdrawn from the world, and directed a community of nuns. Anthony retired to the desert, living in a cave on Mount Colzim.

Descriptions paint him as uniformly modest and courteous. His example led many to take up the monastic life, and to follow his way. Late in life Anthony became a close friend of Saint Paul the Hermit, and he buried the aged anchorite, leading to his patronage of gravediggers. His biography was written by his friend Saint Athanasius of Alexandria.

His relationship with pigs and patronage of swineherds is a little complicated. Skin diseases were sometimes treated with applications of pork fat, which reduced inflammation and itching. As Anthony’s intervention aided in the same conditions, he was shown in art accompanied by a pig. People who saw the art work, but did not have it explained, thought there was a direct connection between Anthony and pigs – and people who worked with swine took him as their patron.

Born

* 251 at Heracleus, Egypt

Died

* 356 at Mount Colzim of natural causes
* relics near Vienne, France

Canonized

* Pre-Congregation

Patronage

* against eczema
* against epilepsy
* against ergotism
* against erysipelas
* against pestilence
* against Saint Anthony’s Fire
* against skin diseases
* against skin rashes
* amputees
* animals
* basket makers
* basket weavers
* brushmakers
* Burgio, Sicily, Italy
* butchers
* Canas, Brazil
* Castrofilippo, Agrigento, Italy
* cemetery workers
* Chiaravalle, Ancona, Italy
* domestic animals
* epileptics
* Fivizzano, Italy
* Fontainemore, Italy
* gravediggers
* graveyards
* hermits
* hogs
* Hospitallers
* monks
* Mook, Netherlands
* pigs
* relief from pestilence
* swine
* swineherds

Representation

* bell
* book
* crutch
* hermit
* man with a pig at his side
* pig
* Saint Anthony’s cross (T or tau-shaped)
* tau cross with a bell on the end

Tuesday, May 3, 2011

Saint Attracta of Killaraght

Also known as

* Abaght of Killaraght
* Adhracht of Killaraght
* Araght of Killaraght
* Athracta of Killaraght
* Taraghta of Killaraght

Memorial

* 11 August

Profile

Daughter of an Irish noble. Drawn from an early age to a religious vocation, which was opposed by her family. Made her religious vows to Saint Patrick at Coolavin, Ireland. Worked with Patrick for the conversion of Ireland. Anchoress at Drumconnell, County Roscommon. At Killaraght (Cill Attracta) on Lough Gara she founded a hospice that still existed as late as 1539. Founded several churches and convents in County Galway and County Sligo. The convents were known for their care of the sick, and were traditionally built at crossroads so they would available to more travellers. Miracle worker, and noted healer. A healing well with her name survives at Clogher, Monasteraden; it has a reputation for especial powers against warts and rickets. Incredibly popular in her own day and in the Middle Ages when popular (i.e., fantastic) biographies of her circulated.

Born

* 5th century in County Sligo, Ireland

Died

* 6th century in Ireland of natural causes

Canonized

* Pre-Congregation

Patronage

* Achonry, Ireland, diocese of
* Men of Lugna

Monday, May 2, 2011

Saint Abachum

Memorial

* 19 January

Profile

Born to the nobility. Son of Saint Maris and Saint Martha, brother of Saint Audifax. Convert. Martyred with his whole family in the persecutions of Aurelian.

Born

* in Persia

Died

* beheaded in 270 at Saint Ninfa, 13 miles from Rome, Italy
* relics discovered in Rome in 1590

Canonized

* Pre-Congregation

Sunday, May 1, 2011

Blessed Aaron of Cracow

Memorial

* 9 October

Profile

Monk at Cluny, France. Spiritual student of Saint Odilo of Cluny. First abbot of the Benedictine abbey at Tyniec, Poland. First archbishop of Cracow, Poland, ordained in 1046.

Died

* 15 May 1059 of natural causes